How Many Concrete Blocks On A Pallet?

Introduction

The number of concrete blocks that can be placed on a pallet is primarily determined by the size of the blocks and the size of the pallet. When the pallet size is fixed, the smaller the block size, the more concrete blocks the pallet can hold. Conversely, if the size of each block is fixed, larger blocks mean fewer can be supported on a single pallet.

I represent LONTTO, a professional brick machine manufacturer. Knowing how many bricks can fit on each concrete block pallet is crucial because it determines the production capacity of the brick machine and also the number of pallets needed. Therefore, this question is key in deciding the size of the brick machine to purchase.

Based on these principles, the size of the pallet often dictates the production capacity of the brick machine. Each model of brick machine requires a pallet of a specific size, making the size of the pallet an especially important parameter.

According to the models of brick machines produced by LONTTO in China, we can identify the models of brick machines that require pallets, as listed below.

The pallet size for small semi-automatic brick machines is 880x480mm

This size specification is important as it determines the number of bricks that can be produced in one cycle of the machine.

The smaller, semi-automatic brick machines are designed to accommodate this specific pallet size, which allows for efficient and effective brick production.

The choice of pallet size directly affects the brick machine’s output, efficiency, and overall operation.

We produce three models of small semi-automatic brick machines: LMT4-40, LMT4-35, and LMT4-26. These models are particularly popular among our customers due to their simplicity in operation, affordability, and high cost-performance ratio, making them ideal choices for entrepreneurs just starting out.

8inch concrete blocks on a pallet

For these three models – LMT4-40, LMT4-35, and LMT4-26 – the pallet size used is 880mm (length) x 480mm (width) x 25mm (thickness). Each pallet can accommodate 4 concrete blocks of size 400mm x 200mm x 200mm. These 200mm wide blocks are also known as 8-inch hollow bricks, equivalently 16 inches x 8 inches x 8 inches in size.

The calculation principle for determining the number of bricks per pallet is as follows:

Pallet width ÷ Width of each brick = Number of bricks per pallet

880mm ÷ 200mm = 4 bricks, with a remainder of 80mm

The remainder of 80mm is evenly distributed as the spacing between each concrete block. This calculation is essential for optimizing the production process and ensuring that the brick machine operates at its full capacity.

400x200x200 concrete blocks on a pallet

6inch concrete blocks on a pallet

If the size of the bricks is 400mm x 150mm x 200mm, which corresponds to what is commonly known as a 6-inch brick or a 16″ x 6″ x 8″ concrete brick, a pallet with dimensions of 880mm x 480mm can accommodate 5 of these concrete hollow bricks.

The calculation for this is as follows:

Pallet width ÷ Width of each brick = Number of bricks per pallet

880mm ÷ 150mm = 5 bricks, with a remainder of 130mm.

400x150x200mm on a pallet

The remainder of 130mm is distributed as spacing between the bricks. This calculation is vital for planning the layout on the pallet and ensuring efficient use of space, which is crucial for maximizing production efficiency and reducing material handling requirements.

5 inch concrete blocks on a pallet

If the brick size is a 5-inch hollow brick, measuring 400mm x 125mm x 200mm, then a pallet with dimensions of 880mm x 480mm can hold 6 concrete hollow bricks.

The calculation for this is as follows:

Pallet width ÷ Width of each brick = Number of bricks per pallet

880mm ÷ 125mm = 6 bricks, with a remainder of 130mm.

400x125x200mm concrete blocks on a pallet

The remainder of 130mm can be distributed as spacing between the bricks. This can be divided as 40mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, and 40mm. These measurements represent the gaps between the bricks. Properly calculating and distributing these gaps is essential for ensuring stability and alignment of the bricks on the pallet, which is crucial for safe handling and transportation.

4 inch concrete blocks on a pallet

If the brick size is a 4-inch hollow brick, measuring 400mm x 100mm x 200mm, then a pallet with dimensions of 880mm x 480mm can accommodate 7 concrete hollow bricks.

The calculation for this arrangement is as follows:

Pallet width ÷ Width of each brick = Number of bricks per pallet

880mm ÷ 100mm = 7 bricks, with a remainder of 180mm.

400x100x200mm concrete blocks on a pallet

The remainder of 180mm can be distributed as spacing between the bricks. This can be divided as 60mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, and 60mm. These measurements represent the gaps between the bricks.

Based on the number of bricks that can fit on a pallet as discussed earlier, it is clear that the size of the bricks determines the number of blocks that can be placed on the pallet.

More specifically, there are two key parameters that dictate the quantity of bricks: one is the width of the pallet, and the other is the width of the concrete block.

This relationship highlights the importance of precision in both brick and pallet dimensions for maximizing efficiency in brick production.

The interplay between these two dimensions directly impacts the production capacity, as it determines how many bricks can be manufactured and transported in each cycle. Understanding and optimizing these parameters is crucial for businesses in the brick manufacturing industry to achieve cost-effectiveness and operational efficiency.

The pallet size for medium-sized fully automatic brick machines is 880x550mm

LONTTO’s medium-sized brick machine models QT4-25C and QT4-18 are fully automatic concrete brick machines. They have a programmable PLC control system, so the entire brick-making process can be automated. The process of placing pallets does not require manual labor, as pallets can be automatically placed under the mold.

400x200x200mm concrete blocks on 880x550 pallet

The pallet size required for medium-sized automatic brick machines is 880mm x 550mm. If the size of the concrete bricks produced is 8 inches, then according to calculations, each pallet can support 4 pieces of blocks (400x200x200mm 8inch).

When producing 400x150x200mm 6-inch concrete blocks, one pallet can accommodate 5 pieces of blocks.

400x150x200mm concrete blocks

When the size of the bricks is 400x125x200mm 5-inch concrete blocks, each pallet can hold 6 pieces of blocks.

400x125x200mm concrete blocks

When the size of the bricks is 400x100x200mm 4-inch concrete blocks, each pallet can hold 7 pieces of blocks.

400x100x200mm concrete blocks

 

The pallet size for large fully automatic brick machines is 1020x570mm

Large fully automatic brick machines start from the QT4-15 model. QT4-15 is a fully automatic hydraulic brick machine, which can be equipped with an automatic pallet transport system, eliminating the need for manual pallet placement. This greatly saves on labor and improves the efficiency of the brick-making process.

The pallet size required for the QT4-15 is 1020x570mm. If the size of the concrete bricks produced is 8 inches, then according to calculations, each pallet can support 4 pieces of blocks (400x200x200mm 8inch).

400x200x200mm concrete blocks

When producing 400x150x200mm 6-inch concrete blocks, one 1020x570mm pallet can accommodate 6 pieces of blocks.

The calculation formula is: 1020mm ÷ 150mm = 6 blocks, with a remainder of 120mm.

The remainder of 120mm can be divided as gaps between the bricks: 35mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 35mm. These sizes represent the spacing between the bricks. So, 35+10+10+10+10+10+35 + (150mm x 6) = 1020mm. This calculation ensures that the bricks are evenly spaced and the pallet is fully utilized.

400x150x200mm concrete blocks

When producing 400x100x200mm 4-inch concrete blocks, one 1020x570mm pallet can accommodate 8 pieces of blocks.

The calculation formula is: 1020mm ÷ 100mm = 8 blocks, with a remainder of 220mm.

The remainder of 220mm can be divided as gaps between the bricks: 75mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 10mm, 75mm. These sizes represent the spacing between the bricks. So, 75+10+10+10+10+10+10+10+75 + (100mm x 8) = 1020mm. This calculation ensures that the bricks are evenly spaced and the pallet is fully utilized.

400x100x200mm concrete blocks

QT8-15 block pallet size 950x900mm

The QT8-15 is a large fully automatic concrete brick machine, requiring pallets sized at 950x900mm. Due to the pallet width of 900mm, it can accommodate two rows of 400mm wide concrete blocks.

Therefore, in each production cycle, it can produce 8 pieces of 16″ x 8″ x 8″ (400x200x200mm) blocks. This means one pallet can hold 8 pieces of blocks.

400x200x200mm hollow concrete blocks

If you are producing concrete blocks with the dimensions of 400x150x200mm (16”x6”x8”), each pallet can accommodate 10 pieces.

400x150x200mm hollow concrete blocks

If you are producing concrete blocks with the dimensions of 400x100x200mm (16”x4”x8”), each pallet can accommodate 14 pieces of concrete blocks.

400X100X200mm concrete hollow blocks

How is the production capacity of a brick machine

calculated, and how many blocks can it produce in a day?

Factors related to the daily production capacity of a brick machine include the size of the bricks, as different sizes of bricks will result in different quantities of bricks produced per cycle.

Another factor is the cycle time of the brick machine. For example, the LMT4-40 has a cycle time of 40 seconds.

First, it’s necessary to know how many bricks the machine can produce in an hour, assuming it works 8 hours a day.

The theoretical hourly production of blocks:

The hourly production of concrete blocks = Number of blocks produced per cycle x Number of cycles per hour.

The daily production of 8-inch blocks:

Taking the LMT4-40 brick machine as an example, and assuming you’re producing 8-inch concrete hollow blocks, then each cycle produces 4 blocks. The pallet can only hold 4pcs of 8-inch blocks per cycle. The LMT4-40 is a small semi-automatic brick machine, requiring 40 seconds per cycle, including manual feeding of raw materials and placement of pallets, as well as the time needed for brick formation. Thus, the cycle time for the LMT4-40 is 40 seconds.

Number of cycles per hour = 3600 seconds ÷ 40 seconds = 90 cycles

Hourly block production = 4 blocks x 90 cycles = 360 PCS

A brick machine, theoretically, works 8 hours a day, although you could operate it for 20 hours a day for higher output. Calculating the block production based on 8 hours of work per day:

Daily block production = Hourly production x 8 hours = 360 PCS x 8 = 2880 PCS

The daily production of 6-inch blocks:

For 6-inch concrete blocks with dimensions of 400x150x200mm, each cycle can produce 5 pieces. Based on the previously mentioned calculation formula:

Hourly production of blocks = 5 blocks x 90 cycles = 450 PCS

Daily production of blocks = 450 PCS x 8 hours = 3600 PCS

Since there are numerous sizes of bricks, it’s not feasible to calculate each one individually. However, with the clear explanation of the calculation principle provided, you can easily calculate the theoretical production capacity for different sizes of blocks on your own.

How many blocks can a pallet hold?

The number of blocks a pallet can hold depends on the size of the pallet, the dimensions of the blocks, and the height and number of layers in which the blocks are arranged. For instance, if a pallet can pack 24 pieces of 8-inch blocks per layer and can accommodate 5 layers, then approximately each pallet can pack 24 x 5 = 120 pieces.

Since the number of blocks placed per layer is not fixed, the total number of blocks packed per pallet also varies.

Note:

The total number of blocks a pallet can pack is not the same concept as the number of blocks a pallet can support during production.

It’s important to understand that the number of blocks a pallet can support during brick machine production affects the machine’s output, and this parameter is of great value.

It is not equivalent to the number of blocks packed on a pallet post-production, which pertains to the backend of production, i.e., the number needed for packing after the blocks are completed. This number is not fixed and cannot be calculated precisely.

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